A-Z Teen Health Glossary



The Struggle of Teens Who are Adopted or in Foster Care

  Teens who do not live with their biological parents might have greater mental health concerns than other teens who do. Of course, there are many children and teens who reside with foster or adoptive parents and who have developed a strong bond with their caregivers. However, for those teens who never had the opportunity…

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Trauma Can Change a Teen’s Life | Paradigm Malibu

Trauma Can Change a Teen’s Life

It’s important to immediately assess a teen’s psychological health if he or she has recently experienced trauma. Typically, a traumatic event is any occurrence in which a teen might have feared for his or her life. Examples include a car accident, witnessing violence, being involved in a natural disaster, witnessing domestic violence, abuse from a…

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Will Affect a Teen’s Development

It’s easy to believe that teens are done with their development, especially if they are 18 or 19 years old. An adolescent might be tall, well built, and appear fully physically developed. However, there is still significant amount of emotional and psychological growth that a teen must still go through. For example, the prefrontal cortex…

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When Trauma Happens Find Mental Health Support

Many teens today have a mental illness. They are struggling with depression, anxiety, attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) or bipolar disorder. In fact, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), just over 20% of teens (ages 13-18), either currently or at some point during their life, have had a seriously debilitating mental disorder. This equates…

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How To Help Your Teen Manage Overwhelming Emotions and Stress

You might not think so but a teen’s ability to manage stress is the same ability required to manage emotions. The two go hand in hand. In fact, this isn’t just true for teens, but for adults as well. This article will address ways to manage life when it becomes overwhelming, including learning how to…

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Those Who Have Social Supports May Improve Their Teen PTSD Symptoms

It might make sense that teens who experience post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a stress disorder that results from a traumatic experience, do better with social supports. That is, when PTSD teens have support from parents, peers, and mental health professionals, they are more likely to heal from the damaging effects of trauma.   Connection…

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Panic Disorder | ParadigmMalibu.com

Treating Teen PTSD and Co-Occurring Psychosis

Sometimes, experiencing a traumatic event (such as a car accident, death in the family, divorce, physical violence, or witnessing violence) won’t leave any lasting effect on a teenager once the event has passed. However, depending on the severity of the event, the resiliency of the teen, their psychological makeup, conditioning, ethnicity, and other factors, the…

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Teen Bipolar Disorder | ParadigmMalibu.com

Teens Are More Vulnerable to PTSD Than Adults

When trauma occurs (such as a car accident, death in the family, divorce, physical violence, or witnessing violence), children, teens, and adults will respond to that difficult experience differently. While experts are still trying to determine what makes some individuals more vulnerable than others and what factors help to foster resiliency, there are certain circumstances…

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Teen Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: New Drug Prevents Fear Memories

Dr. Kerry Ressler, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University School of Medicine, pointed out that what makes Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) unique is that clinicians know when the psychological illness started – at the time of the trauma. Unlike other psychological disorders, where cause is usually guessed at based on a…

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Teens Who Witness Violence Are Vulnerable to PTSD | ParadigmMalibu.com

Teens Who Witness Violence Are Vulnerable to PTSD

Up until recently, it has been thought that those who are the victims of violence, meaning that they experience violence inflicted on themselves, are at risk for developing PTSD. For instance, if a teen has experienced a car accident, rape, or physical/sexual abuse, he or she may be vulnerable to developing PTSD symptoms, such as…

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