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How Gratitude Helps Combat Depression

Combat Depression | Paradigm Malibu

Depression is a condition that often responds to and improves with lifestyle changes in addition to therapy and, in some cases, medication. Some lifestyle changes, such as getting more sleep and exercising each day, are simple to put into effect. Others, however, like cultivating an attitude of gratitude, might seem more elusive. Working on being more grateful can help you combat depression symptoms and make your depression easier to treat. Here are a few ways in which gratitude helps to combat depression, as well as some tops on being more thankful in your everyday life.

 

1. Gratitude Can Give You a New Perspective

When you’re struggling with depression, it can be difficult to get your mind off of your troubles. You might be in physical pain and you’re certainly in emotional pain. Focusing on things that you’re grateful for can help you change your perspective a bit.

 

How? You might need to start small; for example, maybe you don’t feel like you can get out of bed, but you can still be grateful for having a comfortable bed, a soft pillow, a warm blanket.

 

As you look for more and more things to be grateful for, you’ll find more and more to add to your list. It’s similar to the phenomenon that happens when you buy a new car: You start seeing “your” car everywhere. You never knew that there were so many Priuses or Altimas (and in your color, too!). Of course, there aren’t any more of your particular kind of car on the road; you’re just noticing them. The same thing happens when you start to look for little things to be grateful for: they just keep showing up.

 

2. Gratitude Can Help You Smile

When you’re depressed, you might not smile much. It can be hard to think of something to smile about when you are feeling overwhelmed, distressed, and hopeless. Keeping your mind open to the things that you are thankful for can help you smile more. Smiling is not only contagious to others, but it also begets more smiling. You might have heard the advice to fake a smile until it’s real, and it really does work. When you are grateful, however, you won’t even have to fake it!

 

3. Gratitude Can Get You Out of the House

One way that you can show gratitude is to thank others in the community for whatever they are doing to help you or other people. If you challenge yourself to go in a store and thank the checkout clerk, that will give you a mission and get you out of the house. Leaving the house is one way to get some exercise, spend a bit of time in the sun, and interact with others; all of these can help combat depression.

 

4. Gratitude Can Help You Be More Social

Speaking of interacting with others, increasing the amount of time you spend socializing with other people can help combat depression symptoms. Gratitude can include volunteering, and by its nature, volunteering puts you in contact with other people. You will be interacting with not only the people you’re helping but also other volunteers. The shared interest can blossom into a friendship based on shared ideals, and that can be a non-threatening way to further interact. With all of the extra smiling you’ll be doing as you remember what you’re thankful for, you’ll be more likely to make friends, too!

 

Tips for Cultivating Gratitude in Your Life

Sometimes it can be hard to know where to begin when it comes to cultivating an attitude of gratitude. Here are some tips on making thankfulness a habit:

 

Keep a Gratitude Journal

It’s not easy to remember what you’re grateful for on hard days, so writing it down can help. Getting into the habit of journaling about what’s going right in your world can help you remember all that you have going for you on your darkest days. Reread your list often! To start, you can simply list two or three things you’re thankful for at the end of each day. Another good idea is to use some gratitude journal prompts that you find online.

 

Talk About What You’re Grateful For

Saying out loud what you’re glad to have allows you to think it, say it, and hear yourself saying it. This is a great way to cement it into your mind. Also, if you say it to someone else, you’re telling them that you’re trying to see the bright side of life. If you’re thankful for a person, be sure to let them know!

 

Make a Solid Plan to Volunteer to Help Others

One way to show your gratitude for all that you have is to volunteer to work with or for people who don’t have as much as you do. You can do this by working directly with them, by doing behind-the-scenes work like making phone calls or addressing envelopes, or by contributing to the community by taking bottled water to firefighters or participating in a trap-neuter-release program to help control the feral cat population. Make a plan and write it on your calendar. You can also ask a friend or loved one to help hold you accountable.

 

Model Gratefulness to Children or Teens

If you are teaching someone else how to do something, it’s more likely to stick in your own mind. Gratitude is no exception! Talk to your kids or teens about why they should show more gratitude, then model it for them. Be sure to thank those who serve you, like waiters and receptionists. You should also write thank-you notes and thank your children for whatever they do for you. You’ll get the double advantage of being more grateful yourself while also inspiring your kids to show gratitude in their own lives.

 

Combat Depression With Gratitude

Being grateful is just one lifestyle choice you can make that can help combat depression. Of course, gratitude in itself is not a cure; you should still see your mental health specialist for counseling and, if it’s right for you, medication. Remember that depression is not a life sentence; you can get your condition under control once you and your doctor find the right combination of lifestyle changes, therapies, and medicine. Keeping yourself open to the power of gratitude can make your days more pleasant and help you to overcome your depression.

 

 

Dr. Nalin is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, and Founder and Executive Director of Paradigm Treatment Centers, who has been a respected leader in the field of adolescent mental health for more than 20 years. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Southern California, his Master’s degree from Loyola Marymount University, his Doctoral degree from Pacific University’s APA approved Clinical Psychology program, and completed his training at the University of California, San Diego’s APA approved psychology internship program.

Dr. Nalin has provided training and mentoring to students entering the field of psychology at institutions of learning including Pepperdine University’s Graduate School of Education and Psychology, UCSD, Pacific University, and Santa Monica College. He was also instrumental in the development of the treatment component of Los Angeles County’s first Juvenile Drug Court, which now serves as a national model.

Dr. Nalin has appeared as an expert on shows ranging from CBS News and Larry King, to CNN, The Today Show and MTV. He was also featured in an Anti-Drug Campaign for the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP).

Dr. Nalin is a Diplomate of the National Institute of Sports Professionals and a Certified Sports Psychologist as well as a Certified Chemical Dependency Intervention Specialist. He lectures and conducts workshops nationally on the issues of teen mental health, substance abuse prevention, and innovative adolescence treatment.

In 2017 Dr. Nalin was awarded The Sigmund Freud Foundation and Sigmund Freud University’s Distinguished Achievement Award in recognition of his work with youth in the field of mental health over the course of his career.

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